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I saw enouh cases for work up of primary infertility with normal ultrasound reports but while scaning I find Septate, Bicornuate or Unicornuate Uterus

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Dear Dr Bashir Malik,welcome to the forum,can you please send some of your own images on such uterine anomalies,Is there any role of doppler or spectral assessment in your setup?

How many cases do you confirm by other radiological modalities?

DR GILANI 

Respected Sir,

M realy honoured to get your kind response, usually we dnt ve such arrangements to recored images in govt. setup any how I may ve few images but ve to serach but in future I would like to get your openion.

On the last Familycon I come to know tha you are now a days in Pakistan so coordinate with you time to time Inshallh.

Sir m sure you will have images related mulerian ducts anomalies kindly favour and explain on this forum.

warm Regards

Syed Amir Gilani said:

Dear Dr Bashir Malik,welcome to the forum,can you please send some of your own images on such uterine anomalies,Is there any role of doppler or spectral assessment in your setup?

How many cases do you confirm by other radiological modalities?

DR GILANI 

Congenital uterine anomalies are relatively rare and there is no consensus about their clinical significance and optimal management. There is also no agreement about the classification of various types of uterine anomalies. Most authors follow the classification adopted by the American Fertility Society, which divides anomalies in seven different groups. Although appealing, this classification is rather simplistic and does not allow for all the variations in uterine morphology. In addition, it does not include the criteria for differential diagnosis of the various anomalies as it is mainly based on the subjective examination of findings at open surgery. As such, the American Fertility Society Classification is not suited well for use in modern clinical practice, where the diagnosis of uterine anomalies is primarily made using non-invasive diagnostic methods. Nowadays, the assessment of women at high risk of having uterine anomalies, i.e. those who have a history of recurrent miscarriage or infertility, usually starts with an ultrasound scan. The scan is used to detect uterine morphological anomalies that could explain a woman's history of pregnancy losses. Ultrasound is also used in the investigation of many women with unrelated symptoms who, even though at low risk for a congenital uterine anomaly, are diagnosed with one incidentally. In this chapter we will describe the principles of ultrasound diagnosis of uterine anomalies and compare the results with other available diagnostic modalities.

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